List all articles in the database by descending article_id

GET /articles/?page=1426
HTTP 200 OK
Allow: GET, POST, HEAD, OPTIONS
Content-Type: application/json
Vary: Accept

{
    "count": 15514,
    "next": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/articles/?page=1427",
    "previous": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/articles/?page=1425",
    "results": [
        {
            "article_id": 1275,
            "title": "Surface-in pathology in multiple sclerosis: a new view on pathogenesis?",
            "summary": "<div><p>Brain. 2021 Apr 20:awab025. doi: 10.1093/brain/awab025. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">While multiple sclerosis can affect any part of the CNS, it does not do so evenly. In white matter it has long been recognized that lesions tend to occur around the ventricles, and grey matter lesions mainly accrue in the outermost (subpial) cortex. In cortical grey matter, neuronal loss is greater in the outermost layers. This cortical gradient has been replicated in vivo with magnetization transfer ratio and similar gradients in grey and white matter magnetization transfer ratio are seen around the ventricles, with the most severe abnormalities abutting the ventricular surface. The cause of these gradients remains uncertain, though soluble factors released from meningeal inflammation into the CSF has the most supporting evidence. In this Update, we review this 'surface-in' spatial distribution of multiple sclerosis abnormalities and consider the implications for understanding pathogenic mechanisms and treatments designed to slow or stop them.</p><p>PMID:<a href=\"https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876200/?utm_source=Other&amp;utm_medium=rss&amp;utm_campaign=pubmed-2&amp;utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&amp;fc=20210216052009&amp;ff=20210420191740&amp;v=2.14.3\">33876200</a> | DOI:<a href=\"https://doi.org/10.1093/brain/awab025\">10.1093/brain/awab025</a></p></div>",
            "link": "https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876200/#x3D;Other&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&fc&#x",
            "published_date": "2021-07-27T23:00:00Z",
            "source": "PubMed",
            "publisher": "Oxford University Press (OUP)",
            "container_title": "Brain",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/979/",
                    "family_name": "Magliozzi",
                    "given_name": "Roberta",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8284-7763"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/8299/",
                    "family_name": "Reynolds",
                    "given_name": "Richard",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/21054/",
                    "family_name": "Pardini",
                    "given_name": "Matteo",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/21055/",
                    "family_name": "Brown",
                    "given_name": "J William L",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7737-5834"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/21056/",
                    "family_name": "Chard",
                    "given_name": "Declan T",
                    "ORCID": null
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T23:17:41Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Surface",
                "pathology",
                "multiple sclerosis",
                "a new view",
                "pathogenesis"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1093/brain/awab025",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " Multiple sclerosis can affect any part of the CNS, but it does not do so evenly . In white matter lesions tend to occur around the ventricles, and grey matter lesions mainly accrue in the outermost (subpial) cortex ."
        },
        {
            "article_id": 1274,
            "title": "Unexpected worsening of progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy following COVID-19 pneumonia",
            "summary": "<div><p>J Neurovirol. 2021 Apr 19. doi: 10.1007/s13365-021-00980-2. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">Progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy is a serious side effect of natalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis. Here, we report a case of unexpected worsening of natalizumab-related progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy following COVID-19. After natalizumab discontinuation, a slight neurological improvement was observed, but, two months later the patient was admitted to the hospital because of neurological deterioration and COVID-19 mild pneumonia. Except for SARS-CoV-2 infection, no other potential factors of neurological worsening were identified. Thus, we pose the hypothesis that SARS-CoV-2 was instrumental in the progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy deterioration.</p><p>PMID:<a href=\"https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876412/?utm_source=Other&amp;utm_medium=rss&amp;utm_campaign=pubmed-2&amp;utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&amp;fc=20210216052009&amp;ff=20210420191740&amp;v=2.14.3\">33876412</a> | DOI:<a href=\"https://doi.org/10.1007/s13365-021-00980-2\">10.1007/s13365-021-00980-2</a></p></div>",
            "link": "https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876412/#x3D;Other&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&fc&#x",
            "published_date": "2021-01-06T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "PubMed",
            "publisher": "Springer Science and Business Media LLC",
            "container_title": "Journal of NeuroVirology",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/23386/",
                    "family_name": "Borrelli",
                    "given_name": "S.",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-3186-1562"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/23387/",
                    "family_name": "Dachy",
                    "given_name": "B.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/23388/",
                    "family_name": "Gazagnes",
                    "given_name": "M-D.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/23389/",
                    "family_name": "Du Pasquier",
                    "given_name": "R.",
                    "ORCID": null
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T23:17:41Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Unexpected worsening",
                "COVID-19"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1007/s13365-021-00980-2",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " Progressive multifocal leucoencephalopathy is a serious side effect of natalizumab, a humanized monoclonal antibody approved for the treatment of multiple sclerosis ."
        },
        {
            "article_id": 1273,
            "title": "4E-BP2-dependent translation in parvalbumin neurons controls epileptic seizure threshold",
            "summary": "<div><p>Proc Natl Acad Sci U S A. 2021 Apr 13;118(15):e2025522118. doi: 10.1073/pnas.2025522118.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">The mechanistic/mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates multiple signals to regulate critical cellular processes such as mRNA translation, lipid biogenesis, and autophagy. Germline and somatic mutations in mTOR and genes upstream of mTORC1, such as <i>PTEN</i>, <i>TSC1/2</i>, <i>AKT3</i>, <i>PIK3CA</i>, and components of GATOR1 and KICSTOR complexes, are associated with various epileptic disorders. Increased mTORC1 activity is linked to the pathophysiology of epilepsy in both humans and animal models, and mTORC1 inhibition suppresses epileptogenesis in humans with tuberous sclerosis and animal models with elevated mTORC1 activity. However, the role of mTORC1-dependent translation and the neuronal cell types mediating the effect of enhanced mTORC1 activity in seizures remain unknown. The eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4E-binding protein 1 (4E-BP1) and 2 (4E-BP2) are translational repressors downstream of mTORC1. Here we show that the ablation of 4E-BP2, but not 4E-BP1, in mice increases the sensitivity to pentylenetetrazole (PTZ)- and kainic acid (KA)-induced seizures. We demonstrate that the deletion of 4E-BP2 in inhibitory, but not excitatory neurons, causes an increase in the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures. Moreover, mice lacking 4E-BP2 in parvalbumin, but not somatostatin or VIP inhibitory neurons exhibit a lowered threshold for seizure induction and reduced number of parvalbumin neurons. A mouse model harboring a human <i>PIK3CA</i> mutation that enhances the activity of the PI3K-AKT pathway (<i>Pik3ca</i> <sup><i>H1047R-Pvalb</i></sup> ) selectively in parvalbumin neurons shows susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures. Our data identify 4E-BP2 as a regulator of epileptogenesis and highlight the central role of increased mTORC1-dependent translation in parvalbumin neurons in the pathophysiology of epilepsy.</p><p>PMID:<a href=\"https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876772/?utm_source=Other&amp;utm_medium=rss&amp;utm_campaign=pubmed-2&amp;utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&amp;fc=20210216052009&amp;ff=20210420191740&amp;v=2.14.3\">33876772</a> | DOI:<a href=\"https://doi.org/10.1073/pnas.2025522118\">10.1073/pnas.2025522118</a></p></div>",
            "link": "https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876772/#x3D;Other&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&fc&#x",
            "published_date": "2021-04-12T23:00:00Z",
            "source": "PubMed",
            "publisher": "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences",
            "container_title": "Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/18587/",
                    "family_name": "Wang",
                    "given_name": "Peng",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24522/",
                    "family_name": "Sharma",
                    "given_name": "Vijendra",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0945-2623"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24523/",
                    "family_name": "Sood",
                    "given_name": "Rapita",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24524/",
                    "family_name": "Lou",
                    "given_name": "Danning",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0001-9191-5721"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24525/",
                    "family_name": "Hung",
                    "given_name": "Tzu-Yu",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24526/",
                    "family_name": "Lévesque",
                    "given_name": "Maxime",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-1593-7037"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24527/",
                    "family_name": "Han",
                    "given_name": "Yelin",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8563-7147"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24528/",
                    "family_name": "Levett",
                    "given_name": "Jeremy Y.",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0003-2228-9557"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24529/",
                    "family_name": "Murthy",
                    "given_name": "Shravan",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5539-7397"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24530/",
                    "family_name": "Tansley",
                    "given_name": "Shannon",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24531/",
                    "family_name": "Wang",
                    "given_name": "Siyan",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24532/",
                    "family_name": "Siddiqui",
                    "given_name": "Nadeem",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24533/",
                    "family_name": "Tahmasebi",
                    "given_name": "Soroush",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2807-5480"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24534/",
                    "family_name": "Rosenblum",
                    "given_name": "Kobi",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4827-0336"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24535/",
                    "family_name": "Avoli",
                    "given_name": "Massimo",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0534-1977"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24536/",
                    "family_name": "Lacaille",
                    "given_name": "Jean-Claude",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0003-4056-0574"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24537/",
                    "family_name": "Sonenberg",
                    "given_name": "Nahum",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-4707-8759"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/24538/",
                    "family_name": "Khoutorsky",
                    "given_name": "Arkady",
                    "ORCID": null
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T23:17:41Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "4E-BP2-dependent translation",
                "parvalbumin neurons",
                "epileptic seizure threshold"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1073/pnas.2025522118",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " Rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) integrates multiple signals to regulate critical cellular processes such as mRNA translation, lipid biogenesis, and autophagy . Germline and somatic mutations in mTOR are associated with various epileptic disorders . Ablation of 4E-BP2 in inhibitory, but not excitatory neurons, causes an increase in the susceptibility to PTZ-induced seizures ."
        },
        {
            "article_id": 1272,
            "title": "The Gut Microbiome in Progressive Multiple Sclerosis",
            "summary": "<div><p>Ann Neurol. 2021 Apr 19. doi: 10.1002/ana.26084. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">OBJECTIVE: Investigate the gut microbiome in progressive multiple sclerosis (MS) and how it relates to clinical disease.</p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">METHODS: We sequenced the microbiota from healthy controls, relapsing remitting MS (RRMS), and progressive MS patients and correlated the levels of bacteria with clinical features of disease, including EDSS, quality of life, and brain MRI lesions/atrophy. We colonized mice with MS-derived Akkermansia and induced experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis.</p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">RESULTS: Microbiota β-diversity differed between MS patients vs. controls but did not differ between RRMS vs. progressive MS or differ based on disease modifying therapies. Disease status had the greatest effect on the microbiome β-diversity, followed by BMI, race, and sex. In both progressive and RRMS, we found increased Clostridium bolteae, Ruthenibacterium lactatiformans and Akkermansia and decreased Blautia wexlerae, Dorea formicigenerans, and Erysipelotrichaceae CCM. Unique to progressive MS, we found elevated Enterobacteriaceae and Clostridium g24 FCEY and decreased Blautia and Agathobaculum. Several Clostridium species were associated with higher EDSS and fatigue scores. Contrary to the view that elevated Akkermansia in MS has a detrimental role, we found that Akkermansia was linked to lower disability, suggesting a beneficial role. Consistent with this, we found that Akkermansia isolated from MS patients ameliorated EAE, which was linked to a reduction in RORγt+ and IL-17 producing γδ T cells.</p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">INTERPRETATION: While some microbiota alterations are shared in relapsing and progressive MS, we identified unique bacteria associated with progressive MS and clinical measures of disease. Furthermore, elevated Akkermansia in MS may be a compensatory beneficial response in the MS microbiome. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.</p><p>PMID:<a href=\"https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876477/?utm_source=Other&amp;utm_medium=rss&amp;utm_campaign=pubmed-2&amp;utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&amp;fc=20210216052009&amp;ff=20210420191740&amp;v=2.14.3\">33876477</a> | DOI:<a href=\"https://doi.org/10.1002/ana.26084\">10.1002/ana.26084</a></p></div>",
            "link": "https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876477/#x3D;Other&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&fc&#x",
            "published_date": "2021-01-06T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "PubMed",
            "publisher": "Wiley",
            "container_title": "Annals of Neurology",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/1996/",
                    "family_name": "Song",
                    "given_name": "Anya",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0885-7530"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/2158/",
                    "family_name": "Bakshi",
                    "given_name": "Rohit",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0001-8601-5534"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/3914/",
                    "family_name": "Healy",
                    "given_name": "Brian C.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/3915/",
                    "family_name": "Chitnis",
                    "given_name": "Tanuja",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/3917/",
                    "family_name": "Weiner",
                    "given_name": "Howard L.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/7604/",
                    "family_name": "De Jager",
                    "given_name": "Philip L.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/9031/",
                    "family_name": "Glanz",
                    "given_name": "Bonnie I.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/12321/",
                    "family_name": "Wasén",
                    "given_name": "Caroline",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/17139/",
                    "family_name": "Tauhid",
                    "given_name": "Shahamat",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/17140/",
                    "family_name": "Chu",
                    "given_name": "Renxin",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/18819/",
                    "family_name": "Cox",
                    "given_name": "Laura M.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/30975/",
                    "family_name": "Maghzi",
                    "given_name": "Amir Hadi",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/30976/",
                    "family_name": "Liu",
                    "given_name": "Shirong",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/30977/",
                    "family_name": "Tankou",
                    "given_name": "Stephanie K.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/30978/",
                    "family_name": "Dhang",
                    "given_name": "Fyonn H.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/30979/",
                    "family_name": "Willocq",
                    "given_name": "Valerie",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/30980/",
                    "family_name": "Anderson",
                    "given_name": "Mark C.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/30981/",
                    "family_name": "Polgar‐Turcsanyi",
                    "given_name": "Mariann",
                    "ORCID": null
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T23:17:41Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "The Gut Microbiome",
                "Progressive Multiple Sclerosis"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1002/ana.26084",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " Researchers sequenced the gut microbiome from healthy controls, relapsing remitting MS (RRMS), and progressive MS patients . They correlated the levels of bacteria with clinical features of disease, including EDSS, quality of life, and brain MRI lesions/atrophy ."
        },
        {
            "article_id": 1271,
            "title": "Which exercise and behavioural interventions show most promise for treating fatigue in multiple sclerosis? A network meta-analysis",
            "summary": "<div><p>Mult Scler. 2021 Apr 20:1352458521996002. doi: 10.1177/1352458521996002. Online ahead of print.</p><p><b>ABSTRACT</b></p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">BACKGROUND: Fatigue is a common, debilitating symptom of multiple sclerosis (MS) without a current standardised treatment.</p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">OBJECTIVE: The aim of this systematic review with network meta-analyses was to estimate the relative effectiveness of both fatigue-targeted and non-targeted exercise, behavioural and combined (behavioural and exercise) interventions.</p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">METHODS: Nine electronic databases up to August 2018 were searched, and 113 trials (<i>n</i> = 6909) were included: 34 were fatigue-targeted and 79 non-fatigue-targeted trials. Intervention characteristics were extracted using the Template for Intervention Description and Replication guidelines. Certainty of evidence was assessed using GRADE.</p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">RESULTS: Pairwise meta-analyses showed that exercise interventions demonstrated moderate to large effects across subtypes regardless of treatment target, with the largest effect for balance exercise (SMD = 0.84). Cognitive behavioural therapies (CBTs) showed moderate to large effects (SMD = 0.60), with fatigue-targeted treatments showing larger effects than those targeting distress. Network meta-analysis showed that balance exercise performed significantly better compared to other exercise and behavioural intervention subtypes, except CBT. CBT was estimated to be superior to energy conservation and other behavioural interventions. Combined exercise also had a moderate to large effect.</p><p xmlns:mml=\"http://www.w3.org/1998/Math/MathML\" xmlns:p1=\"http://pubmed.gov/pub-one\" xmlns:xlink=\"http://www.w3.org/1999/xlink\">CONCLUSION: Treatment recommendations for balance and combined exercise are tentative as the certainty of the evidence was moderate. The certainty of the evidence for CBT was high.</p><p>PMID:<a href=\"https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876986/?utm_source=Other&amp;utm_medium=rss&amp;utm_campaign=pubmed-2&amp;utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&amp;fc=20210216052009&amp;ff=20210420191740&amp;v=2.14.3\">33876986</a> | DOI:<a href=\"https://doi.org/10.1177/1352458521996002\">10.1177/1352458521996002</a></p></div>",
            "link": "https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/33876986/#x3D;Other&utm_medium=rss&utm_campaign=pubmed-2&utm_content=10guX6I3SqrbUeeLKSTD6FCRM44ewnrN2MKKTQLLPMHB4xNsZU&fc&#x",
            "published_date": "2021-01-10T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "PubMed",
            "publisher": "SAGE Publications",
            "container_title": "Multiple Sclerosis Journal",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/19313/",
                    "family_name": "Picariello",
                    "given_name": "Federica",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-2532-3290"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/19314/",
                    "family_name": "Moss-Morris",
                    "given_name": "Rona",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/21180/",
                    "family_name": "Harrison",
                    "given_name": "Anthony M",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/21181/",
                    "family_name": "Safari",
                    "given_name": "Reza",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/21182/",
                    "family_name": "Mercer",
                    "given_name": "Tom",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/21183/",
                    "family_name": "van der Linden",
                    "given_name": "Marietta L",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/21184/",
                    "family_name": "White",
                    "given_name": "Claire",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/21185/",
                    "family_name": "Norton",
                    "given_name": "Sam",
                    "ORCID": null
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T23:17:41Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Which exercise",
                "behavioural interventions",
                "most promise",
                "fatigue",
                "multiple sclerosis",
                "A network meta-analysis"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1177/1352458521996002",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " Fatigue is a common, debilitating symptom of multiple sclerosis without a standardised treatment . Exercise interventions demonstrated moderate to large effects across subtypes regardless of treatment target . CBT was estimated to be superior to energy conservation and other behavioural interventions ."
        },
        {
            "article_id": 1270,
            "title": "STEAP4 expression in CNS resident cells promotes Th17 cell-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis",
            "summary": "Background: Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating neurological disease caused by autoimmune destruction of the myelin sheath. Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a widely used animal model for the pathogenesis of MS. We and others have previously demonstrated that IL-17 is critical for the pathogenesis of EAE. The concentration of IL-17 is significantly higher in the sera of MS patients than in healthy controls and correlates with disease activity. Moreover, anti-IL-17 neutralizing antibody demonstrated promising efficacy in a phase II trial in MS patients, further substantiating a key pathogenic role for IL-17 in MS. While Th17 and IL-17 are emerging as a bona fide drivers for neuroinflammation, it remains unclear what effector molecule executes the inflammatory tissue destruction in Th17-driven EAE.MethodsBy microarray analysis, we found STEAP4 is a downstream molecule of IL-17 signaling in EAE. We then used STEAP4 global knockout mice and STEAP4 conditional knockout mice to test its role in the pathogenesis of EAE.ResultsHere, we report that the metalloreductase, STEAP4, is a key effector molecule that participates and contributes to the pathogenesis of Th17-mediated neuroinflammation in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. STEAP4 knockout mice displayed delayed onset and reduced severity of EAE induced by active immunization. The reduced disease phenotype was not due to any impact of STEAP4 deficiency on myelin reactive T cells. In contrast, STEAP4 knockout mice were resistant to passively induced EAE, pointing to a role for STEAP4 in the effector stage of EAE. Notably, STEAP4 was only induced the spinal cord of EAE mice that received Th17 cells but not Th1 cells. Consistently, STEAP4 deficiency protected from only Th17 but not Th1-induced EAE. Finally, using Nestin-Cre STEAP4fl/fl mice, we showed that ablation of STEAP4 expression in the resident cells in the central nervous system attenuated disease severity in both active immunization and passive Th17 transfer-induced EAE.ConclusionIn this study, we identified STEAP4 as a Th17-specific effector molecule that participates and contributes to the pathogenesis of neuroinflammation, thus potentially provide a novel target for MS therapy.",
            "link": "https://jneuroinflammation.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12974-021-02146-7",
            "published_date": "2021-04-19T23:00:00Z",
            "source": "BioMedCentral",
            "publisher": "Springer Science and Business Media LLC",
            "container_title": "Journal of Neuroinflammation",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/10823/",
                    "family_name": "Li",
                    "given_name": "Xiao",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26084/",
                    "family_name": "Zhao",
                    "given_name": "Junjie",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26085/",
                    "family_name": "Liao",
                    "given_name": "Yun",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26086/",
                    "family_name": "Miller-Little",
                    "given_name": "William",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26087/",
                    "family_name": "Xiao",
                    "given_name": "Jianxing",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26088/",
                    "family_name": "Liu",
                    "given_name": "Caini",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26089/",
                    "family_name": "Li",
                    "given_name": "Xiaoxia",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26090/",
                    "family_name": "Kang",
                    "given_name": "Zizhen",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0001-5621-8912"
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T21:53:11Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "STEAP4 expression",
                "CNS resident cells",
                "Th17 cell-induced autoimmune encephalomyelitis"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1186/s12974-021-02146-7",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a debilitating neurological disease caused by autoimmune destruction of the myelin sheath . STEAP4 is a downstream molecule of IL-17 signaling in EAE, a widely used animal model for the pathogenesis of MS ."
        },
        {
            "article_id": 1269,
            "title": "Leveraging unstructured data to identify hereditary angioedema patients in electronic medical records",
            "summary": "Background: The epidemiologic impact of hereditary angioedema (HAE) is difficult to quantify, due to misclassification in retrospective studies resulting from non-specific diagnostic coding. The aim of this study was to identify cohorts of patients with HAE-1/2 by evaluating structured and unstructured data in a US ambulatory electronic medical record (EMR) database.MethodsA retrospective feasibility study was performed using the GE Centricity EMR Database (2006–2017). Patients with ≥ 1 diagnosis code for HAE-1/2 (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification 277.6 or International Classification of Diseases, Tenth Revision, Clinical Modification D84.1) and/or ≥ 1 physician note regarding HAE-1/2 and ≥ 6 months’ data before and after the earliest code or note (index date) were included. Two mutually exclusive cohorts were created: probable HAE (≥ 2 codes or ≥ 2 notes on separate days) and suspected HAE (only 1 code or note). The impact of manually reviewing physician notes on cohort formation was assessed, and demographic and clinical characteristics of the 2 final cohorts were described.ResultsInitially, 1691 patients were identified: 190 and 1501 in the probable and suspected HAE cohorts, respectively. After physician note review, the confirmed HAE cohort comprised 254 patients and the suspected HAE cohort decreased to 1299 patients; 138 patients were determined not to have HAE and were excluded. The overall false-positive rate for the initial algorithms was 8.2%. Across final cohorts, the median age was 50 years and > 60% of patients were female. HAE-specific prescriptions were identified for 31% and 2% of the confirmed and suspected HAE cohorts, respectively.ConclusionsUnstructured EMR data can provide valuable information for identifying patients with HAE-1/2. Further research is needed to develop algorithms for more representative HAE cohorts in retrospective studies.",
            "link": "https://aacijournal.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s13223-021-00541-6",
            "published_date": "2021-04-19T23:00:00Z",
            "source": "BioMedCentral",
            "publisher": "Springer Science and Business Media LLC",
            "container_title": "Allergy, Asthma &amp; Clinical Immunology",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/20538/",
                    "family_name": "Brouwer",
                    "given_name": "Emily S.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/20539/",
                    "family_name": "Bratton",
                    "given_name": "Emily W.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/20540/",
                    "family_name": "Near",
                    "given_name": "Aimee M.",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/20541/",
                    "family_name": "Sanders",
                    "given_name": "Lynn",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/20542/",
                    "family_name": "Mack",
                    "given_name": "Christina D.",
                    "ORCID": null
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T21:53:11Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "unstructured data",
                "hereditary angioedema patients",
                "electronic medical records"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1186/s13223-021-00541-6",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " The epidemiologic impact of hereditary angioedema (HAE) is difficult to quantify due to misclassification in retrospective studies . The aim of this study was to identify cohorts of patients with HAE-1/2 by evaluating structured and unstructured data in a US ambulatory electronic medical record (EMR) database ."
        },
        {
            "article_id": 1268,
            "title": "An ensemble of the iCluster method to analyze longitudinal lncRNA expression data for psoriasis patients",
            "summary": "Background: Psoriasis is an immune-mediated, inflammatory disorder of the skin with chronic inflammation and hyper-proliferation of the epidermis. Since psoriasis has genetic components and the diseased tissue of psoriasis is very easily accessible, it is natural to use high-throughput technologies to characterize psoriasis and thus seek targeted therapies. Transcriptional profiles change correspondingly after an intervention. Unlike cross-sectional gene expression data, longitudinal gene expression data can capture the dynamic changes and thus facilitate causal inference.MethodsUsing the iCluster method as a building block, an ensemble method was proposed and applied to a longitudinal gene expression dataset for psoriasis, with the objective of identifying key lncRNAs that can discriminate the responders from the non-responders to two immune treatments of psoriasis.ResultsUsing support vector machine models, the leave-one-out predictive accuracy of the 20-lncRNA signature identified by this ensemble was estimated as 80%, which outperforms several competing methods. Furthermore, pathway enrichment analysis was performed on the target mRNAs of the identified lncRNAs. Of the enriched GO terms or KEGG pathways, proteasome, and protein deubiquitination is included. The ubiquitination-proteasome system is regarded as a key player in psoriasis, and a proteasome inhibitor to target ubiquitination pathway holds promises for treating psoriasis.ConclusionsAn integrative method such as iCluster for multiple data integration can be adopted directly to analyze longitudinal gene expression data, which offers more promising options for longitudinal big data analysis. A comprehensive evaluation and validation of the resulting 20-lncRNA signature is highly desirable.",
            "link": "https://humgenomics.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s40246-021-00323-6",
            "published_date": "2021-04-19T23:00:00Z",
            "source": "BioMedCentral",
            "publisher": "Springer Science and Business Media LLC",
            "container_title": "Human Genomics",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/45287/",
                    "family_name": "Tian",
                    "given_name": "Suyan",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-5942-1542"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/45288/",
                    "family_name": "Wang",
                    "given_name": "Chi",
                    "ORCID": null
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T18:58:11Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "An ensemble",
                "the iCluster method",
                "longitudinal lncRNA expression data",
                "psoriasis patients"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1186/s40246-021-00323-6",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " Psoriasis is an immune-mediated, inflammatory disorder of the skin with chronic inflammation and hyper-proliferation of the epidermis . Transcriptional profiles change correspondingly after an intervention . An ensemble method was proposed and applied to a longitudinal gene expression dataset for psoriasis ."
        },
        {
            "article_id": 1267,
            "title": "Effects of illness perceptions on health-related quality of life in patients with rheumatoid arthritis in China",
            "summary": "AbstractObjectivesFor patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) in China, little is known of how their illness perceptions affect their health-related quality of life (HRQoL). The present study investigated associations between specific illness perceptions due to RA and HRQoL features.MethodsFor 191 patients with RA, illness perceptions were measured using the Brief Illness Perceptions Questionnaire (BIPQ) comprising 8 domains. HRQoL was determined with the Medical Outcomes Study 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey (SF-36). Multivariate linear regression analyses were performed.ResultsThe overall BIPQ of patients with RA was 49.09 ± 11.06. The highest and lowest scores were for concern (9.15 ± 1.81) and personal control (4.30 ± 2.52), respectively. Multivariate stepwise regression analyses showed that the overall BIPQ was significantly negatively associated with each HRQoL feature, and HRQoL total score (β = − 0.343, P < 0.001, 95% CI − 7.080 to − 4.077). Positive associations between BIPQ features and HRQoL included personal control (β = 0.119, P = 0.004, 95% CI 2.857–14.194) and treatment control (β = 0.084, P = 0.029, 95% CI 0.640–12.391). Negative associations with HRQoL were identity (β = − 0.105, P = 0.034, 95% CI − 13.159 to − 0.430) and emotional response (β = − 0.207, P < 0.001, 95% CI − 18.334 to − 6.811).ConclusionsPatients with RA in China perceive their illness in ways that affect their HRQoL. These results suggest that strategies that target these perceptions may improve the quality of life of these patients.",
            "link": "https://hqlo.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12955-021-01770-4",
            "published_date": "2021-04-19T23:00:00Z",
            "source": "BioMedCentral",
            "publisher": "Springer Science and Business Media LLC",
            "container_title": "Health and Quality of Life Outcomes",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/596/",
                    "family_name": "Wang",
                    "given_name": "Yan",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-7744-4078"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/5063/",
                    "family_name": "Wang",
                    "given_name": "Qing",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/10516/",
                    "family_name": "Wang",
                    "given_name": "Juan",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26356/",
                    "family_name": "Zhu",
                    "given_name": "Ping",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/45784/",
                    "family_name": "Yang",
                    "given_name": "Zhe",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/45785/",
                    "family_name": "Zheng",
                    "given_name": "Yan",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/45786/",
                    "family_name": "Peng",
                    "given_name": "Yaling",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/45787/",
                    "family_name": "Xia",
                    "given_name": "Hongli",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/45788/",
                    "family_name": "Ding",
                    "given_name": "Jin",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/45789/",
                    "family_name": "Shang",
                    "given_name": "Lei",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/45790/",
                    "family_name": "Zheng",
                    "given_name": "Zhaohui",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0001-7804-4474"
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T18:58:11Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Effects",
                "illness perceptions",
                "health-related quality",
                "life",
                "patients",
                "rheumatoid arthritis",
                "China"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1186/s12955-021-01770-4",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " For patients with rheumatoid arthritis in China, little is known of how their illness perceptions affect their health-related quality of life (HRQoL) The present study investigated associations between specific illness perceptions due to RA and specific illness features . The overall BIPQ of patients with RA was significantly negatively associated with each HRQOL feature ."
        },
        {
            "article_id": 1266,
            "title": "Getting into a “Flow” state: a systematic review of flow experience in neurological diseases",
            "summary": "Background: Flow is a subjective psychological state that people report when they are fully involved in an activity to the point of forgetting time and their surrounding except the activity itself. Being in flow during physical/cognitive rehabilitation may have a considerable impact on functional outcome, especially when patients with neurological diseases engage in exercises using robotics, virtual/augmented reality, or serious games on tablets/computer. When developing new therapy games, measuring flow experience can indicate whether the game motivates one to train. The purpose of this study was to identify and systematically review current literature on flow experience assessed in patients with stroke, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease. Additionally, we critically appraised, compared and summarized the measurement properties of self-reported flow questionnaires used in neurorehabilitation setting. DesignA systematic review using PRISMA and COSMIN guidelines.MethodsMEDLINE Ovid, EMBASE Ovid, CINAHL EBSCO, SCOPUS were searched. Inclusion criteria were (1) peer-reviewed studies that (2) focused on the investigation of flow experience in (3) patients with neurological diseases (i.e., stroke, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and/or Parkinson’s disease). A qualitative data synthesis was performed to present the measurement properties of the used flow questionnaires. ResultsTen studies out of 911 records met the inclusion criteria. Seven studies measured flow in the context of serious games in patients with stroke, traumatic brain injury, multiple sclerosis and Parkinson’s disease. Three studies assessed flow in other activities than gaming (song-writing intervention and activities of daily living). Six different flow questionnaires were used, all of which were originally validated in healthy people. None of the studies presented psychometric data in their respective research population.ConclusionThe present review indicates that flow experience is increasingly measured in the physical/cognitive rehabilitation setting in patients with neurological diseases. However, psychometric properties of used flow questionnaires are lacking. For exergame developers working in the field of physical/cognitive rehabilitation in patients with neurological diseases, a valid flow questionnaire can help to further optimize the content of the games so that optimal engagement can occur during the gameplay. Whether flow experiences can ultimately have positive effects on physical/cognitive parameters needs further study.",
            "link": "https://jneuroengrehab.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12984-021-00864-w",
            "published_date": "2021-04-19T23:00:00Z",
            "source": "BioMedCentral",
            "publisher": "Springer Science and Business Media LLC",
            "container_title": "Journal of NeuroEngineering and Rehabilitation",
            "authors": [
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26322/",
                    "family_name": "Ottiger",
                    "given_name": "Beatrice",
                    "ORCID": "http://orcid.org/0000-0002-0242-2632"
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26323/",
                    "family_name": "Van Wegen",
                    "given_name": "Erwin",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26324/",
                    "family_name": "Keller",
                    "given_name": "Katja",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26325/",
                    "family_name": "Nef",
                    "given_name": "Tobias",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26326/",
                    "family_name": "Nyffeler",
                    "given_name": "Thomas",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26327/",
                    "family_name": "Kwakkel",
                    "given_name": "Gert",
                    "ORCID": null
                },
                {
                    "url": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/authors/26328/",
                    "family_name": "Vanbellingen",
                    "given_name": "Tim",
                    "ORCID": null
                }
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2021-04-20T18:58:11Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "a “Flow” state",
                "flow experience",
                "neurological diseases"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1186/s12984-021-00864-w",
            "access": "open",
            "takeaways": " Flow is a subjective psychological state that people report when they are fully involved in an activity to the point of forgetting time and their surrounding except the activity itself . Being in flow during physical/cognitive rehabilitation may have a considerable impact on functional outcome . When developing new therapy games, measuring flow experience can indicate whether the game motivates one to train ."
        }
    ]
}