List all articles in the database by published date

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{
    "count": 14259,
    "next": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/articles/?page=1346",
    "previous": "http://api.gregory-ms.com/articles/?page=1344",
    "results": [
        {
            "article_id": 439658,
            "title": "Reappraisal of Lhermitte’s sign in multiple sclerosis",
            "summary": "<jats:p> Lhermitte’s sign (LS) is strongly linked to multiple sclerosis (MS). Our aim is to reassess its frequency, natural history, various characteristics and neuroradiological correlation in a cohort of MS patients attending our specialized MS clinic and to propose a working definition. Consecutive patients with CDMS and normal controls were interviewed using a structured questionnaire. Cervical MRIs were reviewed when available. There were 300 MS patients and 100 normal controls. Forty-one per cent of the patients and none of the controls reported having LS during the course of their illness. In 53% of those who reported LS, it started in the first three years of the illness and began as an isolated symptom in 64% and was polysymptomatic in 36%. In all patients LS was a short-lasting sensation in all patient who experienced it and was mostly stereotyped in individual patients. Characteristics varied widely between patients. Forty-three patients had cervical MRIs; 17 out of 18 patients who reported LS had abnormalities, whereas only 13 out of the 25 with no LS had abnormalities. The results indicate that LS is highly prevalent in MS, is commonly stereotyped in individual patients, has a variable natural course and correlates significantly with cervical MRI abnormalities. A working definition is proposed. </jats:p>",
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1177oa",
            "published_date": "2005-08-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "Joel Oger",
                "Adnan H Al-Araji"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.385252Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Lhermitte",
                "multiple sclerosis"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1177oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        },
        {
            "article_id": 439656,
            "title": "Monthly brain magnetic resonance imaging scans in patients with clinically                 isolated syndrome",
            "summary": "<jats:p> We investigated if monthly gadolinium (Gd)-enhanced magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) can assist the clinician in anticipating the diagnosis of multiple sclerosis (MS) in the very first few months following a clinically isolated syndrome (CIS). A consecutive series of CIS patients with ≥ 3 T2-weighted (T2W) hyperintense brain MRI lesions suggestive of MS were followed up for the first six consecutive months after enrollment with monthly triple-dose Gd-enhanced brain MRI scan. MRI conversion to MS was defined by the presence of either ≥ 1 new Gd-enhancing lesion or ≥ 1 new T2W lesions in the subsequent MRI scan. Sixty patients were included. Of them, 30 (50%) had at least one Gd-enhancing lesion on the baseline MRI scan. After three months, MRI conversion to MS was observed in 80% and 62% of patients based on the appearance of ≥ 1 new T2 lesion and ≥ 1 new Gd-enhancing lesions, respectively. The presence of ≥ 1 new T2W lesion was observed in 90% and 82% of patients who had, at baseline, a Gd-positive MRI scan and dissemination in space based on the new McDonald’s criteria, respectively. The rate of MRI conversion remained almost stable in the last two MRI scans. Our study suggests that the majority of CIS patients with an abnormal baseline scan showed an MRI conversion to MS after three months. The model of six months as the optimal interval for repeating MRI exam is not supported by the present data. </jats:p>",
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1175oa",
            "published_date": "2005-08-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "C Pozzilli",
                "P Pantano",
                "P Pasqualetti",
                "S Di Legge",
                "M C Piattella",
                "F Caramia",
                "I F Pestalozza",
                "G L Lenzi"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.383448Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Monthly brain magnetic resonance imaging scans",
                "patients",
                "clinically                 isolated syndrome"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1175oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        },
        {
            "article_id": 439666,
            "title": "Multiple sclerosis in Tayside, Scotland: detection of clusters using a                 spatial scan statistic",
            "summary": "<jats:p> Debate continues over the relative importance of genetic factors over infectious agents in the aetiology of multiple sclerosis (MS). Detection of clusters of MS in space and time in the Tayside region of Scotland, UK would provide valuable evidence for the movement of infectious agents into a genetically susceptible population. A spatial scan statistic was used to detect, locate and provide a robust statistical test of any clusters found, without prior knowledge of their location or size. This was applied to a population-based MS register for the Tayside region of Scotland from 1970 to 1997, allowing for age at symptom onset, gender, population density and social deprivation. There were a total of 772 cases during the study period; an annual incidence of 7.2 per 100 000. The mean age of symptom onset was 35.7 (SD=10.5) and 73.8% of cases were women. There was a general increase in cases over time probably reflecting gradually better detection and diagnosis. There was a peak around the mid-1990s and some evidence of periodicity. There was a highly significant temporal cluster between 1982 and 1995 (p=0.002) for the whole region. Additionally, a significant spatial cluster for the time period 1993-1995 was found centred in the rural area south-west of Perth (p=0.016). Significant temporal and spatial-temporal clusters are consistent with exogenous factors contributing to the distribution of MS in Tayside, Scotland. </jats:p>",
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1191oa",
            "published_date": "2005-08-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "John DE Parratt",
                "Peter T Donnan",
                "Sally V Wilson",
                "Raeburn B Forbes",
                "Jonathan I O'Riordan",
                "Robert J Swingler"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.392590Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Multiple sclerosis",
                "Tayside",
                "Scotland",
                "detection",
                "clusters",
                "a                 spatial scan statistic"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1191oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        },
        {
            "article_id": 439665,
            "title": "The mechanism of action of methylprednisolone in the treatment of multiple sclerosis",
            "summary": "<jats:p> Methylprednisolone plays an important role in the current treatment of multiple sclerosis (MS), particularly in the acute phase of relapse. It acts in various ways to decrease the inflammatory cycle including: dampening the inflammatory cytokine cascade, inhibiting the activation of T cells, decreasing the extravasation of immune cells into the central nervous system, facilitating the apoptosis of activated immune cells, and indirectly decreasing the cytotoxic effects of nitric oxide and tumor necrosis factor alpha. This paper reviews the most recent observations on these mechanisms both to understand the disease mechanism and its treatment. As more becomes known about these mechanisms, it may become possible to design treatment regimes that are more specific towards both the individual and the disease state. </jats:p>",
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1190oa",
            "published_date": "2005-08-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "J S Sloka",
                "M Stefanelli"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.391697Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "The mechanism",
                "action",
                "methylprednisolone",
                "the treatment",
                "multiple sclerosis"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1190oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        },
        {
            "article_id": 439660,
            "title": "Sequential magnetic resonance imaging follow-up of multiple sclerosis before                 the clinical phase",
            "summary": "<jats:p> There is much evidence of the importance of the preclinical phase of multiple sclerosis (MS). However, apart from a recent report of the incidental discovery of a case of primary progressive MS, there are no data on the sequential magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) follow-up of patients before the clinical phase. We report the incidental discovery of white matter changes on MRI and their follow-up in a patient three years before the first neurological event (optic neuritis). A 34-year-old woman presented with headaches and depression after her young daughter had been involved in a car accident and spent two weeks in intensive care. The woman’s general practitioner performed a brain MRI, which revealed multiple T2-weighted hypersignals suggesting MS. During the next three years, clinical examination remained normal but we observed new T2 lesions and/or new enhanced T1 lesions after gadolinium infusion on the four successive MRIs. Thirty-seven months after the first MRI, the patient developed a right optic neuritis. The diagnosis of MS was made according to space and time dissemination on MRI criteria. We proposed a treatment with Interferon Beta 1a (Avonex). </jats:p>",
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1179oa",
            "published_date": "2005-08-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "J de Seze",
                "P Vermersch"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.387167Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Sequential magnetic resonance",
                "follow-up",
                "multiple sclerosis",
                "the clinical phase"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1179oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        },
        {
            "article_id": 439683,
            "title": "Validation of the NARCOMS Registry: pain assessment",
            "summary": "<jats:p> The North American Research Committee on Multiple Sclerosis (NARCOMS) Registry is a multiple sclerosis (MS) self-report registry with more than 24 000 participants. Participants report disability status upon enrolment, and semi-annually using Performance Scales (PS), Patient Determined Disease Steps (PDDS) and a pain question. In November 2000 and 2001, we also collected the Pain Effects Scale (PES). Our aim was to validate the NARCOMS pain question using the PES as our criterion measure. We measured correlations between the pain question and age, disease duration, various PS subscales and PDDS to assess construct validity. We correlated pain question responses in participants who reported no change in PDSS or the PS subscales between questionnaires to determine test—retest reliability. We measured responsiveness in participants who reported a substantial change in the sensory, spasticity PS subscales. The correlation between the pain question and PES was r=0.61 in November 2000, and r=0.64 in November 2001 (both P&lt;0.0001). Correlations between the pain question and age, and disease duration were low, indicating divergent validity. Correlations between the pain question and spasticity, sensory PS subscales and PDSS were moderate, indicating convergent validity. Test—retest reliability was r=0.84 (P&lt;0.0001). Responsiveness was 70.7%. The pain question is a valid self-report measure of pain in MS. </jats:p>",
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1167oa",
            "published_date": "2005-06-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "Ruth Ann Marrie",
                "Gary Cutter",
                "Timothy Vollmer",
                "Tuula Tyry",
                "Olympia Hadjimichael"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.408046Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Validation",
                "the NARCOMS Registry",
                "pain assessment"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1167oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        },
        {
            "article_id": 439680,
            "title": "Motor cortex excitability and fatigue in multiple sclerosis: a transcranial                 magnetic stimulation study",
            "summary": "<jats:p> We investigated electrophysiological correlates of fatigue in patients with multiple sclerosis (MS). Transcranial magnetic stimulation (TMS) was used to explore motor excitability in three groups of subjects: MS patients with fatigue (MS-F), MS patients without fatigue (MS-NF) and healthy control subjects. All participants had to perform a fatiguing hand-grip exercise. TMS was performed prior to and after the exercise. Prior to the motor task, MS-F patients had less inhibition in the primary motor cortex compared to both other groups. Postexercise, intracortical inhibition was still reduced in the MS-F patients compared to the MS-NF patients. In MS-F patients the postexercise time interval for normalization of the motor threshold was correlated with the fatigue severity. We conclude that MS patients with fatigue have an impairment of inhibitory circuits in their primary motor cortex. The results also indicate that fatigue severity is associated with an exercise-induced reduction of membrane excitability. </jats:p>",
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1163oa",
            "published_date": "2005-06-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "C Heesen",
                "J Liepert",
                "D Mingers",
                "T Bäumer",
                "C Weiller"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.405088Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "multiple sclerosis"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1163oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        },
        {
            "article_id": 439676,
            "title": "Successful pregnancy of a patient with Balo's concentric sclerosis",
            "summary": null,
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1158oa",
            "published_date": "2005-06-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "L. Airas",
                "T. Kurki",
                "H. Erjanti",
                "R. J Marttila"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": null,
            "ml_prediction_lr": null,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.401509Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Successful pregnancy",
                "a patient",
                "Balo's concentric sclerosis"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1158oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        },
        {
            "article_id": 439685,
            "title": "Serum ferritin, transferrin and soluble transferrin receptor levels in                 multiple sclerosis patients",
            "summary": "<jats:p> Over the last few years, increased evidence has supported the role of iron dysregulation in the pathogenesis of multiple sclerosis (MS), as iron is essential for myelin formation and oxidative phosphorylation. We studied indices of iron metabolism, such as serum iron, ferritin, transferrin and soluble transferrin receptor (sTFR) levels in 27 MS patients. Seven patients had chronic progressive active disease (CP-A), six had chronic progressive stable (CP-S), ten had relapsing—remitting active (RR-A) and four had relapsing—remitting stable (RR-S) disease. sTFR levels were found to be significantly higher in CP-A (P=0.021) and RR-A (P= 0.004) patients than in controls. sTFR levels were also elevated in CP-S patients but did not reach significance (P=0.064). sTFR values in RR-S patients were comparable to those found in controls (P=0.31). Ferritin levels were significantly elevated only in CP-A patients (P= 0.002). Patients of the CP group had significantly higher ferritin values than the RR patients (P= 0.004). Haemoglobin values as well as iron and transferrin levels were within normal limits in all patients. In conclusion, the increased serum sTFR and ferritin levels in nonanaemic MS patients with active disease reflect the increased iron turnover. The mild elevation of sTFR levels in CP-S patients may indicate active inflammation with ongoing oxidative damage that is not detectable by history or examination. </jats:p>",
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1171oa",
            "published_date": "2005-06-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "Constantinos Sfagos",
                "Alexandros C Makis",
                "Aristeidis Chaidos",
                "Eleftheria C Hatzimichael",
                "Androniki Dalamaga",
                "Katerina Kosma",
                "Konstantinos L. Bourantas"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.409737Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Serum ferritin",
                "transferrin",
                "soluble transferrin receptor levels",
                "                multiple sclerosis patients"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1171oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        },
        {
            "article_id": 439684,
            "title": "Severity of chronic pain and its relationship to quality of life in multiple sclerosis",
            "summary": "<jats:p> Introduction: This study used reliable and validated instruments to compare pain severity in multiple sclerosis (MS) to that in other chronic painful conditions, and to examine relationships between chronic pain in MS and health-related quality of life (HRQOL). Methods: Ninety-nine MS patients completed a self-administered survey comprised of the Medical Outcomes 36-Item Short-Form Health Survey, the Short-Form McGill Pain Questionnaire, and the Hospital Anxiety and Depression Scale. Results: Pain severity was not different between MS patients with pain and rheumatoid arthritis (P=0.77) or osteoarthritis (P=0.98) patients. Chronic pain in MS was less often neurogenic than non-neurogenic, although severity of neurogenic pain was greater than that of non-neurogenic pain (P=0.048). Chronic pain in MS was found to have no significant relationship to age, disease duration or disease course. Instead, we found that pain was correlated with aspects of HRQOL, particularly mental health (r=0.44, P&lt;0.0001) versus physical functioning (r=0.19, P&gt;0.05). Chronic pain was significantly related to anxiety and depression for females but not for males with MS. Conclusions: Chronic pain in MS is as severe as pain in arthritic conditions and is associated with reduced HRQOL. Thus, pain can be a significant symptom for MS patients and the need for treatment may be underestimated. </jats:p>",
            "link": "https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/pdf/10.1191/1352458505ms1168oa",
            "published_date": "2005-06-01T00:00:00Z",
            "source": "SAGE Publications",
            "authors": [
                "Lorraine V Kalia",
                "Paul W OConnor"
            ],
            "relevant": null,
            "ml_prediction_gnb": false,
            "ml_prediction_lr": false,
            "discovery_date": "2022-06-09T10:40:10.408914Z",
            "noun_phrases": [
                "Severity",
                "chronic pain",
                "its relationship",
                "quality",
                "life",
                "multiple sclerosis"
            ],
            "doi": "10.1191/1352458505ms1168oa",
            "access": "restricted"
        }
    ]
}